Your question: How many languages does the average South African speak?

A rough estimate based on Census 2001 first-language data and a 2002 study of second-languages speakers is that the average South African – man, woman and child – uses 2.84 languages. Obviously, many people are limited to one, and many others able to speak three, four or more languages.

How many languages does the average African speak?

List of official, national and spoken languages of Africa. Africa is a continent with a very high linguistic diversity, there are an estimated 1500-2000 African languages.

What are the top 3 languages spoken in South Africa?

The most common language spoken as a first language by South Africans is Zulu (23 percent), followed by Xhosa (16 percent), and Afrikaans (14 percent). English is the fourth most common first language in the country (9.6%), but is understood in most urban areas and is the dominant language in government and the media.

How many languages are in South Africa?

There are eleven official languages in South Africa. These are English (9.6%), Afrikaans (13.5%), Ndebele (2.1%), Sepedi (9.1%), Xhosa (16%), Venda (2.4%), Tswana (8%), Southern Sotho (7.6%), Zulu 22.7%), Swazi or SiSwati (2.5%) and Tsonga (4.5%).

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What languages are spoken in southern Africa?

South Africa

Official Languages: Afrikaans, English, Zulu, Xhosa, Ndebele, Venda, Swati, Sesotho, Sepedi, Tsonga and Tswana. With over 11 official languages (and a few more unofficial) South Africa really is the rainbow nation!

What is the oldest African language?

Afrikaans is one of the official languages of South Africa. It belongs to the West Germanic branch of the Indo-European family. It evolved from the variety of Dutch which was spoken by Dutch settlers in South Africa.

Which country has most bilinguals?

Papua New Guinea is the most multilingual country, with over 839 living languages, according to Ethnologue, a catalogue of the world’s known languages. The site ranked countries and territories based on the number of languages spoken as a first language within their borders.

How do u say hello in South Africa?

South Africa

  1. Zulu: Sawubona (Hello)
  2. Xhosa: Molo (Hello)
  3. Afrikaans: Hallo (Hello)
  4. English: Hello.

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Is Afrikaans a dying language in South Africa?

The Afrikaans language is one of South Africa’s official languages and a large proportion of the local population uses it as their first or second language. It is still taught in schools. … Some believe that Afrikaans is a dying language, however, it remains spoken all over the country and respected for its origins.

Who speaks English in South Africa?

According to Statistics South Africa, only 8.4% of South African households speak English – that’s just 4.7 million people in a country of 56 million. English is only the sixth-most common home language in the country, after Zulu (24.7%), Xhosa (15.6%), Afrikaans (12.1%), Sepedi (9.8%), and Setswana (8.9%).

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What are the 11 languages?

South Africa’s Constitution recognises 11 official languages: Sepedi (also known as Sesotho sa Leboa), Sesotho, Setswana, siSwati, Tshivenda, Xitsonga, Afrikaans, English, isiNdebele, isiXhosa and isiZulu. For centuries South Africa’s official languages were European – Dutch, English, Afrikaans.

What is the main religion in South Africa?

Almost 80% of South African population adheres to the Christian faith. Other major religious groups are Hindus, Muslims and Jews.

Is Afrikaans a white language?

Afrikaans was constructed as a “white language”, with a “white history” and “white faces”.

What is the most spoken language in Africa?

The most spoken language in Africa is Swahili which is said to have between 100 and 150 million speakers. Known as a ‘Bantu’ language, Swahili apparently originated from other languages like Arabic.

What does Haibo mean in Zulu?

12. Jislaaik, Jussie, Jo, Haibo, and Haw | Used to express surprise or confusion. Example: “Jislaaik bru, that was a big wave!” or “Haibo, you’re not 21.”

Across the Sahara