Why is my African violet getting leggy?

Why Is My African Violet Plant Leggy? African Violet plants become leggy when the light they receive is too low. The stems start growing longer in size and growing upwards as if they are reaching for the light. The leaves no longer grow flat as they usually should, but grow upwards too.

What do I do when my African Violet gets leggy?

The best way to combat leggy African violets is to repot to give it a fresh space and fertilize with Espoma’s Violet! liquid plant food. This will help keep your plant growing new leaves to help keep it from becoming leggy and will enhance the colors of your flowers.

How do you rejuvenate African violets?

If a majority of the roots are still white or light-colored, prune off the rotted roots, and re-pot the plant in soil for African violets in a container with several drainage holes. You can water from top or bottom with water at room temperature or slightly warmer. Make sure the plant to drain well.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Who can request a death certificate in South Africa?

Do African violets need to be pruned?

About African Violet Pruning

African violets are a bit old fashioned, but they are still one of the most popular indoor blooming plants. … You can cut back an African violet at any time of the year, unlike the pruning rules on many other types of plants.

Do African violet plants need a lot of light?

African violets need bright light to bloom, but cannot tolerate hot, direct sun because their leaves are easily scorched by intense light.

How often should African violets be watered?

“How often to water African violets?” is perhaps the most pondered African violet dilemma. The best guide is to feel the top of the soil: if it is dry to the touch, then it is time to water. African violets should be allowed to dry out between each watering for best results. Overwatering can kill a plant.

Do African violets like to be crowded?

Violets need to feel crowded to bloom, but when a plant gets too big for its pot, divide the plant’s separate-looking leaf heads. … Place in potting soil after the roots and leaves become well formed.

Why are the bottom leaves of my African violet drooping?

Watering is at the root of all African violet drooping leaves’ problem. For instance, when the potting soil is too dry, the leaves will droop because they aren’t getting enough moisture. On the other hand, the plant will also droop when the soil is too wet.

Can you bring an African violet back to life?

If it’s been a while since you watered your African violet, give it a good drink; its leaves should spring back to life within 24 hours. If, on the other hand, your African violet is well-watered and still droopy, check to see if your plant is by an air vent.

IT IS INTERESTING:  At what age can a child be left home alone in South Africa?

How long can African violets live?

African violets can live a long time, as long as 50 years! To get them there, you need to provide good care which includes repotting African violets. The trick is knowing when to repot an African violet and what soil and container size to use.

Do I deadhead African violets?

Deadhead African violets to encourage more blooms. African violets make useful flowering houseplants since they can bloom for up to nine months per year. They do need the other three months off as a rest period.

How do I know if my African violet is getting too much sun?

You can tell if your violet has proper sunlight by checking the leaves. In too much sunlight, the leaves turn yellow and the edges burn. In too little sunlight, the leaves will appear to be a healthy green, but there will be no blooms.

Is coffee grounds good for African violets?

Yes, coffee grounds are a great homemade fertilizer for African Violets. Make a mixture of dried coffee grounds and dried egg shells, then work the coffee ground mixture into the top of the soil.

Can African violets grow under LED lights?

A full spectrum LED light strip can also work for African Violet plants, especially those with a higher ratio of red/blue wavelengths mixed in with green and yellow wavelengths. These strips can provide a balanced mixture of lights.

Across the Sahara