Is there a common African language?

Afrikaans Portuguese
Arabic Spanish
English Swahili
French other languages

What is the most common language spoken in Africa?

The most spoken language in Africa is Swahili which is said to have between 100 and 150 million speakers. Known as a ‘Bantu’ language, Swahili apparently originated from other languages like Arabic.

What is the main language in Africa?

While Arabic is the most spoken language in Africa, there’s plenty more – other popular languages include Amharic, Berber, Portuguese, Oromo, Igbo, Yoruba, Zulu and Shona.

Is there a universal African language?

Not only is Africa the second most populous continent in the world with over one billion people, but it is also home to the highest linguistic diversity in the world, with over 1500 different languages. The principle languages on the continent include Arabic, French and English.

What are the top 10 languages spoken in Africa?

10 Most Spoken Languages in Africa

  • Swahili: Swahili, known as Kiswahili in the native tongue, is a Bantu language spoken by some 150 million Africans in the African Great Lakes region in Central and Southern Africa. …
  • Arabic: …
  • French: …
  • Hausa: …
  • Yoruba: …
  • Oromo: …
  • Igbo: …
  • Amharic:
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9.04.2021

What is the oldest African language?

Afrikaans is one of the official languages of South Africa. It belongs to the West Germanic branch of the Indo-European family. It evolved from the variety of Dutch which was spoken by Dutch settlers in South Africa.

Who speaks the best English in Africa?

A report by the World Linguistic Society has named Uganda as the best English speaking country in Africa. The study names Uganda at the top, followed by Zambia, South Africa and Kenya respectively.

What is the hardest language to learn in Africa?

Taa, the last vital language of the Tuu language family and formerly called ʻSouthern Khoisan’, it is believed to be the world’s most difficult language. Part of the Khoisan language group and is spoken in the Kalahari Desert of Southern Africa, it is also known as ! Xóõ or !

What is the largest language family in Africa?

The Niger-Congo language family is the largest group of Africa (and probably of the world) in terms of the number of languages.

Which African country has its own alphabet?

Ethiopia is the only African country with its own alphabet. It’s also the world’s oldest living alphabet – Ethiopic – and probably one of the longest with its 345 letters.

Which language is mostly spoken in South Africa?

The most common language spoken as a first language by South Africans is Zulu (23 percent), followed by Xhosa (16 percent), and Afrikaans (14 percent).

Which language is spoken most in world?

English is the largest language in the world, if you count both native and non-native speakers. If you count only native speakers, Mandarin Chinese is the largest. Mandarin Chinese is the largest language in the world when counting only first language (native) speakers.

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Which country in Africa has the most languages?

Nigeria: And the African country with the most languages is… Nigeria. The official language is English, while 24 million people speak Igbo. 4.

What is the main religion in Africa?

The majority of Africans are adherents of Christianity or Islam. African people often combine the practice of their traditional belief with the practice of Abrahamic religions. Abrahamic religions are widespread throughout Africa.

How much of Africa speaks English?

How Many People Speak English In Africa? As in the Caribbean, a number of African countries have English as an official language because of colonialism. In all of Africa — a population of about 1.2 billion — only 6.5 million people speak English as their native language.

Which African language is easiest to learn?

Swahili is said to be the easiest African language for an English speaker to learn. It is heavily influenced by Arabic and Indo-European languages such as Portuguese, German, English, and French. It’s one of the few sub-Saharan African languages that have no lexical tone, just as in English.

Across the Sahara