Frequent question: What did Dr Livingstone discover in Africa?

This filled huge gaps in western knowledge of central and southern Africa. In 1855, Livingstone discovered a spectacular waterfall which he named ‘Victoria Falls’. He reached the mouth of the Zambezi on the Indian Ocean in May 1856, becoming the first European to cross the width of southern Africa.

What did David Livingstone do in Africa?

David Livingstone (1813-73) was a Scottish missionary and medical doctor who explored much of the interior of Africa. In a remarkable journey in 1853-56, he became the first European to cross the African continent. Starting on the Zambezi River, he traveled north and west across Angola to reach the Atlantic at Luanda.

What is Livingstone famous for?

David Livingstone, the Scottish explorer, abolitionist and physician who is famous for being the first European to discover Victoria Falls, initially hoped to go to China as a missionary. When the first Opium War broke out in September 1839, his plans changed, and Livingstone focused his ambitions on Africa instead.

Who found Dr Livingstone in Africa?

In November 1871, journalist Henry Morton Stanley located the missing missionary David Livingstone in the wilds of Africa. Yet the famous meeting was only the beginning of Stanley’s tumultuous career as an explorer.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Who owns Independent News and Media South Africa?

When did Livingstone go to Africa?

Who Was David Livingstone? David Livingstone pursued training in medicine and missionary work before moving to Africa in 1841. He crossed the continent from east to west and would ultimately come across many bodies of water previously uncharted by Europeans, including the Zambezi River and Victoria Falls.

How many years was Livingstone in Africa?

In 1841, Livingstone arrived in South Africa where he would spend eleven years at various inland stations, chiefly as missionary to the BaKwena under the leadership of Sechele.

How long was Livingstone in Africa?

David Livingstone, who had been missing in Africa for four years. Although Livingstone’s achievements charting the unknown African continent had galvanized Britain, his government had been apathetic about rescuing him. Bennett decided Americans would do what the British would not.

What was David Livingstone looking for?

David Livingstone was a Scottish missionary, doctor, abolitionist, and explorer who lived in the 1800s. He sought to bring Christianity, commerce, and “civilization” to Africa and undertook three extensive expeditions throughout much of the continent.

What difficulties did David Livingstone face?

His immune system weakened because of his consistent sickness, along with malnutrition, which eventually led to his death at midnight on May 1, 1871. David Livingstone is a hero because he gave up an easy life for a life of hardships to explore Africa for the rest of the world.

Where was Dr Livingstone found?

Luckily he was found alive near Lake Tanganyika in October 1871, by another explorer and journalist, Henry Stanley who upon finding Dr. Livingstone, allegedly uttered those famous words, ‘Dr.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Does East Africa have volcanoes?

What was the famous greeting of David Livingstone when he was found?

Henry Morton Stanley had been sent to find him by the New York Herald newspaper in 1869. He found Livingstone in the town of Ujiji on the shores of Lake Tanganyika on 10 November 1871, greeting him with the now famous words “Dr Livingstone, I presume?”

Why did Dr Livingstone go to Africa?

Livingstone became convinced of his mission to reach new peoples in the interior of Africa and introduce them to Christianity, as well as freeing them from slavery. It was this which inspired his explorations. In 1849 and 1851, he travelled across the Kalahari, on the second trip sighting the upper Zambezi River.

Why did Henry Stanley travel to Africa?

In 1874, the New York Herald and the Daily Telegraph financed Stanley on another expedition to Africa. His ambitious objective was to complete the exploration and mapping of the Central African Great Lakes and rivers, in the process circumnavigating Lakes Victoria and Tanganyika and locating the source of the Nile.

Who were David Livingstone’s faithful servants?

Waller, Horace (ed.). The Last Journals of David Livingstone in Central Africa From Eighteen Hundred and Sixty Five to His Death. Continued by a Narrative of his last Moments and Sufferings Obtained from His Faithful Servants, Chuma and Susi. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1875.

Across the Sahara